Experimental Image-Making, 2014.

Experimental image-making with paper folding, to create abstract imagery. 

3D Materials Project: Adornment, 2013.
Adornment piece influenced by the following quote, ‘Simplicity and complexity need each other.’ - John Maeda. Collar constructed by paper using various folding techniques.

3D Materials Project: Adornment, 2013.

Adornment piece influenced by the following quote, ‘Simplicity and complexity need each other.’ - John Maeda. Collar constructed by paper using various folding techniques.

Delft-inspired Surface Design, 2013 / 14.
My work is an on-going exploration of combining both textiles and graphic design by handling shape, colour, image, texture, and surface - implementing my design skills to create original surface designs that can be applied to either Fashion or Interiors. I integrate both traditional and modern techniques within my work, such as silk screen printing and laser cutting to communicate my ideas.
This body of work centres Delftware, with emphasis on surface ornamentation that’s depicted on hand-painted Delft earthenware. Delftware, or Delft pottery, denotes blue and white pottery made in and around Delft in the Netherlands and the tin-glazed pottery made in the Netherlands from the 16th century. My interest in Delftware came from a visit to Killerton House, where by I discovered the house’s range of Delft earthenware that displayed exquisite hand-painted surface decoration; a notable example of fine craftsmanship. This provided me with a creative stimulus to base my work upon, and to inform my ideas. The work exhibited has also taken influence from the house itself, primarily being the interior ornamentation present on the ceilings, walls, and fire places. The fuse of the two influences found at Killerton, culminates in a body of work that is a response to the house and its historical contents.
Being influenced by both European and Chinese decorative motifs that predominately adorn Delft earthenware, this pattern repeat is a graphic representation of Delftware designs, displaying floral motifs found in Delftware. From the onset, my intention was to revive traditional Delftware, simplifying the ornate designs commonly depicted on Delftware to create a refined aesthetic, that yet retains the traditional feel of Deltware through use of recognisable motifs and colour. Applying the pattern in blue and white without varying tones of blue, gives the design clarity while still having the ability to be conspicuous. This uncomplicated use of colour embraces the elaborate line work, removing any distraction created by varying tones to focus purely on the floral motifs delineated. I explored properties of cloth woven from yarns spun from natural fibres, and how the surface pattern could be translated onto natural surfaces including cotton, silk, wood and paper. The printed fabrics displayed show slight imperfections that have been captured through the nature of using a traditional print process; adding to the period feel that the work has been based upon.

Delft-inspired Surface Design, 2013 / 14.

My work is an on-going exploration of combining both textiles and graphic design by handling shape, colour, image, texture, and surface - implementing my design skills to create original surface designs that can be applied to either Fashion or Interiors. I integrate both traditional and modern techniques within my work, such as silk screen printing and laser cutting to communicate my ideas.

This body of work centres Delftware, with emphasis on surface ornamentation that’s depicted on hand-painted Delft earthenware. Delftware, or Delft pottery, denotes blue and white pottery made in and around Delft in the Netherlands and the tin-glazed pottery made in the Netherlands from the 16th century. My interest in Delftware came from a visit to Killerton House, where by I discovered the house’s range of Delft earthenware that displayed exquisite hand-painted surface decoration; a notable example of fine craftsmanship. This provided me with a creative stimulus to base my work upon, and to inform my ideas. The work exhibited has also taken influence from the house itself, primarily being the interior ornamentation present on the ceilings, walls, and fire places. The fuse of the two influences found at Killerton, culminates in a body of work that is a response to the house and its historical contents.

Being influenced by both European and Chinese decorative motifs that predominately adorn Delft earthenware, this pattern repeat is a graphic representation of Delftware designs, displaying floral motifs found in Delftware. From the onset, my intention was to revive traditional Delftware, simplifying the ornate designs commonly depicted on Delftware to create a refined aesthetic, that yet retains the traditional feel of Deltware through use of recognisable motifs and colour. Applying the pattern in blue and white without varying tones of blue, gives the design clarity while still having the ability to be conspicuous. This uncomplicated use of colour embraces the elaborate line work, removing any distraction created by varying tones to focus purely on the floral motifs delineated. I explored properties of cloth woven from yarns spun from natural fibres, and how the surface pattern could be translated onto natural surfaces including cotton, silk, wood and paper. The printed fabrics displayed show slight imperfections that have been captured through the nature of using a traditional print process; adding to the period feel that the work has been based upon.

Laser-cut Alphabet, 2013. 

Type experiment looking into the structure of the alphabet, and accentuating shapes that are inherent in written language to create abstract yet recognisable letterforms. Negative shapes have been given equal notability to the positive, to create more expressive forms that culminates into a visually dynamic alphabet.

Fragmented Typography, 2013. 
Further type experiment looking into the structure of the alphabet, and accentuating shapes that are inherent in written language to create abstract yet recognisable letterforms. Negative shapes have been given equal notability to the positive, to create more expressive forms that culminates into a visually dynamic alphabet. 

Fragmented Typography, 2013. 

Further type experiment looking into the structure of the alphabet, and accentuating shapes that are inherent in written language to create abstract yet recognisable letterforms. Negative shapes have been given equal notability to the positive, to create more expressive forms that culminates into a visually dynamic alphabet. 

Linocut Typography Experiments, 2013.
Linocut typography experiments centring distortion and playing with illegibility to form an alphabet, the message ultimately being: at what point does a letter become completely illegible?

Linocut Typography Experiments, 2013.

Linocut typography experiments centring distortion and playing with illegibility to form an alphabet, the message ultimately being: at what point does a letter become completely illegible?

Screen Printed Business Cards, 2013. 
Business cards for College’s end of year Art and Design Show.

Screen Printed Business Cards, 2013. 

Business cards for College’s end of year Art and Design Show.

‘Veteran’ Illustration - Ballpoint Pen, 2013.

This illustration has been depicted using a ballpoint pen to delineate fine detail, defining a face. My aim from the onset is to convey both the depicted person’s expression and character that have an aspect of ambiguity. My emphasis is on depicting older characters that appear to tell their own stories from the very creases and wrinkles of their faces, revealing the scars of a life lived.

‘Veteran’ Illustration - Ballpoint Pen, 2013.
This illustration has been depicted using a ballpoint pen to delineate fine detail, defining a face. My aim from the onset is to convey both the depicted person’s expression and character that have an aspect of ambiguity. My emphasis is on depicting older characters that appear to tell their own stories from the very creases and wrinkles of their faces, revealing the scars of a life lived.
Progress shots of 'Veteran' Illustration - Ballpoint Pen, 2013. 

Progress shots of 'Veteran' Illustration - Ballpoint Pen, 2013. 

"Design is thinking made visual." - Saul Bass

‘Fisherman’ Illustration - Ballpoint Pen, 2012.
This illustration I drew for a Graphics project at College. The illustration has been drawn using biro, where I have focused on fine detail to define the face; conveying both the Fisherman’s expression and character.
Shortlisted Entry  The Plough Arts Centre, Open Drawing Competition, 2012

‘Fisherman’ Illustration - Ballpoint Pen, 2012.

This illustration I drew for a Graphics project at College. The illustration has been drawn using biro, where I have focused on fine detail to define the face; conveying both the Fisherman’s expression and character.

Shortlisted Entry 
The Plough Arts Centre, Open Drawing Competition, 2012